Tac Iff Color

 

 

The Archaeology Channel

Conference on Cultural Heritage Film



18 - 19 May, 2015, University of Oregon Baker Downtown Center, Eugene, Oregon, USA

 

Exploring the human cultural legacy on screen!

 

 

Our Conference is becoming a Convention next year! To find out more click here.

 

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

In conjunction with our twelfth annual The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival, The Archaeology Channel Conference on Cultural Heritage Film promotes discussion and collaboration regarding the uses of cultural heritage film.  TAC Festival and Conference bring to Oregon the world’s best films on archaeology, ancient cultures, and the world of indigenous peoples.  Our speakers will promote the creation, distribution and use of cultural heritage film as an influence for broad cultural awareness and will encourage the exchange of new ideas and approaches to employ film for the common good of all humanity.  See below for the Conference program information.

 

 

Conference Schedule

 

Monday, May 18:

 

10:00 am

Cinema Verite

Bahman Nooraei, Documentary and Experimental Film Center, Tehran, Iran

 

11:00

Experiential Film Making and the Intersection of Art and Archeology

Jennifer Lane, Fourth Density and ArcheoProductions, Austin, Texas

 

12:00 pm    Lunch Break

 

1:00

Story Truth: The Battle between Truth and Reality in Documentary Films

Daniel Bruns, Advanced Laboratory for Visual Anthropology, California State University, Chico

 

2:00

Saving Una’s Island

Edward and Melissa Phillips, Our Village Films, Eugene, Oregon

 

3:00

TBA

 

4:00

The Evolution of Distribution Opportunities for Cultural Heritage Film in the New Media World

Richard Pettigrew, Archaeological Legacy Institute, Eugene, Oregon

 

Tuesday, May 13:

 

10:00 am

Oral Traditions in Archaeological Research and Film

Paul Ehrlich, Beaver Creek, Oregon

 

11:00

Archaeology of Pakistan: Scope in Academic World with Reference to Visual Archaeology

Abdul Rauf Kakepoto, Shah Abdul Latif University,  Khairpur, Sindh, Pakistan

 

12:00 pm    Lunch Break

 

1:00

Lost in Translation: The Art of Communicating Archaeology in the Media

Angela Patton & Patrick R. Durst, Illinois State Archaeological Survey, University of Illinois

 

2:00

“Geki-cine” – The New Trend of Japanese Heritage Films

Kenta Shimokaji, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University

 

3:00

Strata: Portraits of Humanity--Promoting Critical Thinking and Artistic Expression in the Classroom

Shirley Gazsi,  AntiquityNOW, New York, NY

 

4:00    TBA

 

Presentation Abstracts

(Alphabetical Order by Speaker’s Last Name)

 

Story Truth: The Battle between Truth and Reality in Documentary Films

Daniel Bruns

 

This will be an open discussion on the concept of Story Truth and the film, Impact of the Frolic.  Story Truth is the concept of creating art in a way that most accurately represents reality.  We will talk about the technical and creative challenges we faced while trying to stay true to the research behind the Frolic shipwreck in our film while also taking questions from audience members who are interested in how Impact of the Frolic was made.

 

 

Oral Traditions in Archaeological Research and Film

Paul Ehrlich

 

Oral traditions are useful in the study of buildings, features and artifacts of vanished societies.  In our documentary, Masao Hadley: The Worship of Nan Madol, Archaeologists Adam Thompson and I show Mr. Hadley narrating the history of Nan Madol as the foundation of Pohnpei’s culture.  Masao Hadley was a renowned Pohnpeian historian who integrated stories of Nan Madol and other sacred places with the culture that he saw in action throughout his life.  This paper focuses on the life and work of Masao Hadley as an example of how archaeology, anthropology and oral history work together in research and film.

 

 

Strata: Portraits of Humanity--Promoting Critical Thinking and Artistic Expression in the Classroom

Shirley Gazsi

 

Strata: Portraits of Humanity is a monthly half-hour video showcase for unique and diverse stories about the world’s cultural heritage produced by Archaeological Legacy Institute.  As ALI’s educational partner ,AntiquityNOW is writing curriculum (middle/high school) for each episode that promotes critical thinking, language and artistic development, and an appreciation of cultural preservation issues.  AntiquityNOW’s mission is to raise awareness of the importance of preserving our cultural heritage by demonstrating how antiquity’s legacy influences our lives today.  These lessons plans encourage students to explore how the ancient stories told by Strata resound in the 21st century and how the act of creation is resilient and timeless.  Our lesson plans are intended to spark young imaginations to ponder how the ancient past is not as distant as they may think.

 

 

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Archaeology of Pakistan:  Scope in Academic World with Reference to Visual

Abdul Rauf Kakepoto

 

Pakistan nowadays is considered as a country having extremist elements who not only are trying to change mindsets of people towards religion but also are a threat to heritage sites of ancient Pakistan that they consider non-Muslim heritage.  Visual archaeology has the potential to play an academic role to make a new generation of Pakistanis as well as the world aware of the significance of these sites.

 

The heritage of Pakistan is an archaeological laboratory for the world because of its chronological data applicable to understanding the geomorphological, paleontological, anthropological and archaeological material that lies under its soil.  Prehistoric Pakistan in general can be ordered from the Potohar region of the northern to southern Rohri hills and coastal areas of the southern provinces of Sindh and Baluchistan, highlighting major sites.  Protohistoric material will be shown through slides covering major sites, i.e., Harappa, Mohenjo Daro and later developments in Swat and other northern parts.  Historic Pakistan includes the Aryan Grave culture, Vidic Period, Epic Period, Buddhist heritage (Hinayana, Mahayana, Nyangma) the later dynasties Uddiyana (Swat) Hindushahi, and Muslim to British heritage sites.

 

 

Experiential Film Making and the Intersection of Art and Archeology

Jennifer Lane

 

Even the most contemporary practice of art making is always linked to the whole history of art, muchof which has been uncovered and understood through the discipline of archaeology.  But could artists and their work ever inform archaeology’s quest for understanding?  In this talk, I will share images ofmy art and discuss my new work-in-progress, a film that documents neolithic dolmens and passagegraves across the Iberian peninsula using an “experiential” approach to filmmaking.  I’ll talk aboutusing a human-scaled perspective and other techniques to try and translate the feeling of the body’srelationship to each site as it is proscribed by the site itself and I will pose the question of whether acontemporary and subjective experience of an ancient site could ever be useful in understanding thatsite’s purpose and meaning for ancient people.

 

 

Cinema Verite

Bahman Nooraei B

 

In this presentation, I will discuss the organization of the most important documentary film festival in Iran, the Iran International Documentary Film Festival, Cinema Verite, which is currently in its ninth year and gaining momentum like no one could imagine at first.  I will discuss how the Festival is run today, plus relevant statistical information.  In addition, I will present the very first Archaeology and Cinema Forum which was held in Tehran several months ago, discussing the role it plays in the preservation of cultural heritage and how it has affected the number of cultural heritage, anthropological and archaeological film productions in its aftermath.  The forum is planned to be held every other year.

 

 

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Lost in Translation: The Art of Communicating Archaeology in the Media

Angela Patton and Patrick R. Durst

 

The public’s fascination with archaeology has meant that archaeologists have to deal with media more regularly than other scholarly disciplines.  How archaeologists communicate their research to the public through the media and how the media view archaeologists has become an important feature in the contemporary world of academic and professional archaeologists.  This paper addresses the wide range of questions in this intersection of fields.  An array of media forms are covered including video, film, photography, and social media, with a focus on the overriding question: What are the long-term implications of the increasing exposure through and reliance upon media forms for archaeology in the contemporary world?

 

 

The Evolution of Distribution Opportunities for Cultural Heritage Film in the New Media World

Richard Pettigrew

 

The world of media, as predicted way back in the 90s, has gone digital, opening up countless new possibilities for distribution and audience viewing.  Despite this, most cultural heritage films today still are viewed in a very limited range of venues.  The distribution world is chaotic.  Few film makers break into the limited spectrum offered by PBS, National Geographic, History, and Discovery.  However, ALI has been working aggressively to develop a variety of both online and cable TV venues for our own programming and that of our partners.  This presentation continues the discussion carried out over the past four years at TAC Conference on Cultural Heritage Film with an update on ALI’s progress in developing distribution outlets.

 

 

Saving Una’s Island

Edward and Melissa Phillips

 

The importance of video documentation for the preservation of indigenous cultures is more critical today than it was just ten years ago.  Ironically, it is film that has accelerated the loss of culture, as remote peoples get electricity and are exposed to western culture through DVDs.

 

In our six years of sailing through the South Pacific we found a frightening number of small islands that have fallen victim to this new form of western encroachment.  Elders passing down tribal lore find themselves in competition with major film companies.  Children are much more interested in a world of Superheros, high speed chases, and explosions.  Tribal history, lore and the island way of life are being lost.

 

The purpose of our ethnographic documentary film, “Saving Una’s Island,” was to capture the unique culture of one Melanesian island and save a way of life for future generations.  We produced an 84-minute version in English and a separate four-hour version in Fijian for the clan.

 

 

“Geki-cine” - The New Trend of Japanese Heritage Films

Kenta Shimokaji

 

I’d like to talk about new style of Japanese heritage films, Geki-cine.  The issue of heritage films has become one of the most interested topics in Film Studies.  Even though the term “heritage films” originally generated from British films, the idea of the heritage film has begun to be applied to the cinema of other countries.  One factor that Japanese heritage films shares with British heritage films is the representation of the national past.  To project the vision of the national past, “heritage films” require settings, architectures and period costumes.  These items are also used in theatrical performances.  Geki-cine is a new movement of the theater entertainment in Japan.  Shooting Geki(Stage)and making it to Cine(Cinema) is the main content of it.  At this point, I’d like to define the mean of heritage films specifically, then I conclude what role can Geki-cine play in the field of heritage films.

 

 

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